Audio: Stiegler Media Philosophy Lecture Series

Follow the link below to get the full audio recordings of lectures 1-4 of the 5 lecture ‘Media Philosophy’ course delivered by French philosopher Bernard Stiegler at Goldsmiths College, University of London in February/March 2012. Lecture 5 has been postponed and will be held on 2nd May. We’ll put up a link to it after that.

Stiegler analyses and critiques work by Derrida, Deleuze and others in order to elaborate on the concept of bêtise (stupidity) in relation to his own theories about the dangers of monetarism and marketing, the pharmacological nature of technology and the responsibility of the University and educational institutions to counteract the ‘systemic stupidity’ currently embedding itself in society.

http://soundcloud.com/katalogx

What is Industry? Stiegler, Mollona, Ribault & Lash

An excerpt from the conference Autoproduction: Dialogues in Critical Political Economy held 22nd February 2012 at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

autoproduction

Patricia Ribault (Ecole Supérieure des Arts et Design, Reims)
Bernard Stiegler (Centre Pompidou)
Scott Lash (Goldsmiths, Centre for Cultural Studies)
Mao Mollona (Chair – Goldsmiths, Anthropology)

Discuss the question “what is industry?”

Autoproduction: Dialogues in Political Economy

The (double-dip) recession of 2008 to the present has turned into what is technically a depression.

The UK is not likely to reach 2007 levels of GDP until 2015: worse than the 1930s depression, the last time it took seven years to reach a previous peak GDP was in 1832.

The central responsibility of the finance sector for this crash has signaled the urgency of industry and production. Given the dominance of China and the BRICs in the traditional sectors, what way forward for the UK and Europe? In an information age, what model of the industrial can make sense? What kind of critical political economy of the industrial?

At this point we need to think of the possibility of autoproduction. Autoproduction is the possibility of a mode of production in which the work of design and work of fabrication are fused. In which the means of design are also the means of production. At stake are dedicated, singular products, working in close collaboration with product users. In which autoproduction becomes a co-production.

Patricia Ribault, who has originated this idea and practice at ESAD in France, will lead off this dialogue, followed by interventions from Bernard Stiegler, Scott Lash, and Mao Mollona in the Chair.

Part of the Centre for Cultural Studies Series: Interventions in Critical Political Economy.

Audio: Capitalism or Markets? Scott Lash & Bernard Stiegler

Full audio of  ‘Capitalism or Markets?: An Exchange – Bernard Stiegler and Scott Lash’ (9th January 2012 at Goldsmiths, University of London), organised by the Centre for Cultural Studies.

The talk addressed some of the following questions:

What is critical political economy today? Has neo-liberalism produced a system of domination in which capital has reduced labour not just to an object but to what Heidegger called a ‘standing reserve’,: that is a Marxist ‘reserve army of labour’ that no longer has a stake in the productive system resulting in conflagrations like Tottenham 2011? Or does a new industrialism driven by technological media open up a possible political space of ‘care’, enabling open relations of bonding between humans and among human and code-driven machines? How would such a political economy address the emerging powers in an age when Obama is destined to be the last president of what will have been the world’s most powerful nation? Is China (India) neo-liberal or is it possible to have the sociality of markets without capitalism? Is Foucault right to counterpose the positivity of a liberalism based in a classical political economy of Smith and Ricardo against the bio-political domination of a neo-liberalism and today’s neo-classical economics? Do we live in a post-industrial, knowledge society, or instead in the possibility of a new industrial order, in which industrial classes are pitted against the excesses of finance capital?

Scott Lash Questions Stiegler’s Notion of Belief

This is the second video excerpt from “Capitalism or Markets?: An Exchange – Bernard Stiegler and Scott Lash” (9th January 2012 at Goldsmiths University of London), in which Lash responds to Stiegler’s previous point on proletarianisation.

The full audio of the talk-exchange is now available to listen online or to download.

The talk addressed some of the following questions:

What is critical political economy today? Has neo-liberalism produced a system of domination in which capital has reduced labour not just to an object but to what Heidegger called a ‘standing reserve’,: that is a Marxist ‘reserve army of labour’ that no longer has a stake in the productive system resulting in conflagrations like Tottenham 2011? Or does a new industrialism driven by technological media open up a possible political space of ‘care’, enabling open relations of bonding between humans and among human and code-driven machines? How would such a political economy address the emerging powers in an age when Obama is destined to be the last president of what will have been the world’s most powerful nation? Is China (India) neo-liberal or is it possible to have the sociality of markets without capitalism? Is Foucault right to counterpose the positivity of a liberalism based in a classical political economy of Smith and Ricardo against the bio-political domination of a neo-liberalism and today’s neo-classical economics? Do we live in a post-industrial, knowledge society, or instead in the possibility of a new industrial order, in which industrial classes are pitted against the excesses of finance capital?

Bernard Stiegler on the Question of the Proletariat

This is the first excerpt from “Capitalism or Markets?: An Exchange – Bernard Stiegler and Scott Lash” (9th January 2012 at Goldsmiths University of London), in which Stiegler responds to a question on class struggle. The talk, which will be published in full ( so watch this space for more recordings in the forthcoming weeks) addressed some of the following questions:

What is critical political economy today? Has neo-liberalism produced a system of domination in which capital has reduced labour not just to an object but to what Heidegger called a ‘standing reserve’,: that is a Marxist ‘reserve army of labour’ that no longer has a stake in the productive system resulting in conflagrations like Tottenham 2011? Or does a new industrialism driven by technological media open up a possible political space of ‘care’, enabling open relations of bonding between humans and among human and code-driven machines? How would such a political economy address the emerging powers in an age when Obama is destined to be the last president of what will have been the world’s most powerful nation? Is China (India) neo-liberal or is it possible to have the sociality of markets without capitalism? Is Foucault right to counterpose the positivity of a liberalism based in a classical political economy of Smith and Ricardo against the bio-political domination of a neo-liberalism and today’s neo-classical economics? Do we live in a post-industrial, knowledge society, or instead in the possibility of a new industrial order, in which industrial classes are pitted against the excesses of finance capital?